The Winds of Change

The privileged did not appreciate our protest, and shockingly neither did the state. A few days after our meeting, a state representative pulled me out of accounting class to share his respective regarding justice and oppression. He advised me to accept things for what they were and things would get better in due time. I instructed him that my parents, my church, and my community had started training me at an early age to fight injustice.

The time has moved forward an hour.  The temperature seems to be on the increase.  In a poetic parallel to nature, society moved forward a wrinkle in time and the political climate continues to heat up. 

A change is about to come, and like that Phil Collins song, I can feel it in the air tonight.  While some shout resentment and disappointment at the multitude of students that marched and stood for progress regarding gun control, I give them a standing ovation.  Bravo!  

The old guard is being slowly disarmed.  A new wave of leadership is being developed to transform this nation into something contrary to the standards of yesteryear.

This is not the first time young people have stood up for justice, but this is effort is not restricted to a Ferguson or Baltimore. This is a national movement that will continue to evolve and break ballot boxes, loosen legal strongholds, and weaken the grips of lobbying groups such as the NRA.  

It reminds me of a time when I, as a high school senior, shared with the state accreditations committee that we, as African Americans, were tired of the double standard of our high school in relation to race and socio-economic status.

Needless to say the privileged did not appreciate our protest, and shockingly neither did the state. A few days after our meeting, a state representative pulled me out of accounting class to share his respective regarding justice and oppression.

He advised me to accept things for what they were and things would get better in due time. I instructed him that my parents, my church, and my community had started training me at an early age to fight injustice. 

I am so proud to see that fight continues in the spirit of our young people today.  In the spirit of the students of Greensboro to Tiananmen Square the fight continues!  They are saying boldly that if they are old enough to die, then they are old enough to protest!

And what a cool breeze of change this wind is blowing in.  

 

(Rev. Steven L. Evans is a pastor and lives in Clinton.)

My Clinton News

P.O. Box 180
513 North Broad St.
Clinton, SC 29325
Phone: (864) 833-1900
Fax: (864) 833-1902

 

Sign Up For Breaking News

Stay informed on our latest news!

Manage my subscriptions

Subscribe to My Clinton News Newsletter feed
Comment Here